Ideas & MaterialsProjects

Geochronostromatopio

There is a kind of rocks that I really like and they are called stromatolites. The name comes from Greek words “στρῶμα-λίθος・stromatos-lithos・layer-rock”. As the name suggests, they are rocks created from many layers of calcium carbonate deposited from the oldest living photosynthetic organism cyanobacteria’s   life activity and mud, accumulated and harden over a period of several million years. If we were to look at each layer of the rocks carefully, we would be able to know the environment and activities that took place on Earth in each period. Some of stromatolites exist as fossils, formed over two billion years ago, and some of them are alive, still growing in the places such as Shark Bay, Australia.

Gazing at stromatolites, I think about the Earth. Albeit of the scale differences, the Earth is also a rock – alive and active -, consisting of many layers. If we were to closely analyze each layer of the Earth and trace back Earth’s timeline, we would also be able to know the environment and activities that took place on the Earth in each period.

Then, I think about us, human, who have come to exist at the end of the timeline. I have heard that, our ancestor, Pithecanthropus was already walking on two legs by three million years ago. When they started walking on two legs, the separation was perhaps created between them and the ground, which used to be one with them. As they evolved and became human and civilizations progressed, the separation increasingly grew bigger. In the present, we often look at the Earth objectively, say as an admirable landscape or a usable resource.

I had the chance to spend quite some time in Hokkaido last year. Especially during my stay in Shiretoko, I had the chance to observe and get in touch with the land, natural phenomena and people living there. Through this experience, I had a sensation of myself being part of the Earth, for the first time. For many of us who are living in conveniently built environments, it rarely happens that we have a realization of this apparent fact, unless we are faced with some kind of disaster. I started working on a new work in collaboration with the designer, Shojiro Okuno, taking this sensation as a starting point.

Our attempt in this work is to make a landscape appear for a period of time in the underground walkway, which is a part of the built-up, urban environment in Sapporo. The landscape is Geochronostromatopio:a layered landscape created from a variety of images that are pointing to different moments of the Earth’s timeline, including minerals, topography, sceneries and traces of human activities. We sincerely hope that it will work as a device to trigger people, who are conducting their routine activity of walking through the underground walkway, to trip out into different time spans in Earth’s history and momentarily wind-up as a part of the time-capsule landscape of the Earth.

 

Aki Nagasaka & Shojiro Okuno
April 2019, Sapporo

 

 

私がとても好きな石にストロマトライトとよばれるものがある。この石の名前は、「στρῶμα-λίθος・stromatos–lithos・ 層をなした岩」というギリシャ語に由来していて、最古の光合成生物といわれるシアノバクテリアの生命活動によってできた物質と泥が、何千万年という時間をかけて層をなしたものが石になっているそうだ。それぞれの層をじっくり見ていくと、その時々の地球の環境やどんな出来事が起こっていたかがわかるそうだ。20億年以上前にできたストロマトライトの化石もあれば、オーストラリアのシャークベイなどには今も成長し続ける、生きたストロマトライトもあるらしい。

ストロマトライトを眺めながら、地球のことを考える。スケールは全く違うが、地球も活動し続ける岩石で、たくさんの層からできている。そして、それぞれの層を読みときながら時間軸をさかのぼることで、その頃の地球の環境やどんな活動が行われていたかを知ることができるらしい。

その地球の時間軸の末端に登場した私たち人間のことを考えてみる。約300万年前、私たちの祖先にあたる猿人たちは二足歩行をしていたそうだ。二足歩行を始めると、それまでは自分たちと一体だと思っていた地面と彼らの間には境目ができたのかもしれない。彼らが進化して人間になり、文明が進歩するにつれて、その境目はどんどん大きくなっていったのだろう。そして、現代に生きる私たちは地球をめでるべき風景や、活用できる資源として、私たちから切り離されたものとして見ているように思う。

私は去年、北海道で多くの時間を過ごし、とくに知床の土地やそこで起こるさまざまな自然現象、そこで暮らす人たちに触れることをとおして、「私たちも地球の一部」という感覚を初めて持った。整備された便利な環境で暮らす私たちは、なにか災害が起こらない限り、この当たり前の事実を実感する局面は少ない。今回の作品は、この感覚をもとにして制作を始めた。

500m美術館での試みは、都市の生活環境の一部をなしている地下歩行空間に一時的に「風景」を出現させることだ。そして、それは地球の異なる時間が層をなして並立している風景Geochronostromatopio》だ。地下歩行空間に出現したGeochronostromatopio が、いつものようにそこを歩いている人々が一瞬、今ではない地球時間へトリップ・アウトするような、また、異なる地球時間を内包するその風景と一体になったような錯覚をおこすトリガーになればと願っている。

 

2019年4月
長坂 有希 & 奥野 正次郎

 

Your Name *
Your E-mail *
Message